Author: Troy Lambert

“Anywhere is in walking (biking) distance if you have the time.”

The Human Powered Season Week 1: Remember the formula from school? Distance equals rate times time. So if a bicycle leaving Chicago travels at … Wait. Don’t go. Just kidding. No word problems, just some observations from week one of this experiment. Why it should work: I’m working mostly at home, freelance. So I really don’t need to go that far, right? Sure, we live out in Kuna, Idaho far from the bustle (and bike friendly trails, sidewalks, and streets) of Boise. Most of the time, I don’t need to go there, right? I may want to, but those things can wait. For some reason, not this week. When I am determined to drive less and bike more, urgent errands come to the fore that are time sensitive. No, I can’t bike 30 miles in an hour, then bike back, pick up my wife, etc. The Durango I want to park carried my bike farther than I rode it this week. Disclaimer: I am more of a conservationist than an environmentalist. But less driving means less emissions, even if just locally. It also means less money on gas, and better health for the person doing the riding. I’m not going to go deep into the issues here, another blog on that later, but suffice it to say this is a personal goal and decision. I’m not trying to save the...

Read More

George and the Achievers Part 2:

What Authors (and others) Can Learn About Marketing from the Achievers and George Takei Part 2: Make the Connection In part one of this series we introduced The Achievers and George Takei, two completely different types of internet phenomena. We looked at their core audience. You can read that post here. So they had a solid fan base: core fans. You have them too, whether you are an author, or a business. How do you connect them? They may be scattered all over the world. What tools do you use to bring them together? Internet Forums. The achievers used the birth of social media: an internet forum to share the word about their passion. Fans gathered around a little known film released in the late 1990’s, and found they had more in common then they at first realized. Some even made love connections in the group. More modern forms of these include Goodreads, Kindle Discussion Boards, and Facebook Groups. Facebook. Originally a social media outlet similar to MySpace, Facebook took off and became an advertisers dream: millions of reachable customers and fans all gathered in one giant stadium. The problem is, you are one hot dog vendor among thousands, and your customers are scattered throughout the seats. How do you get them to come to you, to “sit” in your section? Once they sit there, how do you make...

Read More

Select a Charity

Another of my stories has been accepted in an anthology. It is titled “The Angel.” It is different than my usual stories. How is it different? Here are the guidelines given for the anthology: the story must based on a fairy tale, have something “undead” as one of the characters (i.e. ghost, angel, zombie, etc.), and it had to have a happy ending. My stories don’t always have a happy ending. In fact, I’ve been accused of writing dark fiction. I’ve been accused of worse too, but that’s another story.. My story is based on the less known fairy tale “The Angel” by Hans Christian Anderson. He based that story on his poem “The Dying Child.” My characters, of course, are angels. So far, everyone who has read the story has wept. So I decided quite awhile ago that if the story was accepted, I’d donate half of the proceeds from my royalties from this story to a children’s charity. This is where I need your help. I’ll take suggestions, we’ll narrow it down with a survey or two, and we’ll take a vote. Comment with suggestions and website links, or e-mail me here. T-shirts, prizes, and fun will accompany the release and the charity choice. An event page is coming to Facebook, but for now follow my author page here, and I’ll post the details there. Follow me...

Read More

George and the Achievers

What Authors (and others) Can Learn About Marketing from the Achievers and George Takei Part 1: Your Core Audience How does a star of a television program that aired in the late 1960’s rise in social media to have 3.8 million followers, sell out a musical performed at the Globe in San Francisco about Japanese citizen interment in the United States during World War II, and influence opinion nationwide about marriage equality and LBGT rights? How do Will Russell and Scott Shuffitt go from tattoo vendors at a convention in 2002 to international sensations by 2009, hosting conventions centered around a movie released in March of 1998 with minimal success and a small cult following? You’ve written a great book. The people who have read it that are not your  mother, father,  brother, sister, cousin . . . you get the idea, have told you so. Not enough of them have read it though. How do you get it noticed? How do you go from a small book with a small cult following to an international sensation? What can we learn from the two examp les above?   Disclaimer: I am not a master marketer. I am just learning some of these things myself. I don’t have 3.8 million followers, and I haven’t filled a convention center in Las Vegas with 4,000 people to watch an old movie together...

Read More

Suspend Reality (for readers)

What is the balance between reality and the unreal, between truth and fantasy? As a reader, how much truth do you want? Let’s face it. Reality is boring. We read to escape reality, not to study it. That’s science, another topic for another day. 24: It’s a good example. Jack Bauer drives from Oakland to LAX in ten minutes, something we know to be a 45 minute drive with no traffic and some bending of local speed statutes. But for the sake of the show, we also don’t want to watch Jack drive for 45 minutes while his world falls apart miles away. We root for him to get there, to fix it in time. After all, he’s the hero. At some point though, the put on drama gets to be too much. We want a dose of reality. Can jack really get the crap beat out of him and an hour later fight a hoard of spies, who apparently, despite their taxpayer-funded training can’t hit a thing with their pistols? Is he the only expert shot in the group? Balance: One of the keys to keeping you hooked is balance. As a reader, how much can you take? What is the point where you shut off the show or movie, walk out, or put the book down never to go back to it? How much fiction is too...

Read More

Social Media Icons

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On GooglePlusVisit Us On PinterestCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Linkedin

Find me on Authorgraph

Get your e-book signed by Troy Lambert

Recent Comments