Skip to content

A Peek at my TBR List: Lessons Learned

handinjuryI’m sitting here, typing with a rather sore hand, and so last night I decided that today might be a good time to catch up on video edits (that I can do with one hand) and on my To Be Read list. In the middle of the night, while waiting for more ibuprofen to kick in, I mentally wnet through the list and discovered something amazing.

I have to preface this by saying I am not a genius. Recently I’ve been reading Rise of the Machines by Kristen Lamb. It outlines what kind of marketing works for books, and why traditional methods don’t work. Why am I reading Kristen’s book, and not one of the dozens of others out there on the subject? Because I “know” Kristen from her Facebook page and her blog, which attracted my attention with its very practical and practicable writing and marketing tips. Hmm. let’s look at the rest of the list, and see what we can learn from it.

Every writer with priority on my TBR list is a friend on Facebook or Away from Keyboard. (We used to say In Real Life, but social media IS real life any more). Okay, not everyone. I am reading The Art of Happiness by His Holiness the Dalai Lama and I don’t “know” him, although I have seen his image on meme’s several times. Here’s a list of authors:

Vincent Zandri, Hugh Howey, Allan Leverone, Heath Lowrance, Poppet, Karen Vaughn, Dellani Oakes, Brid Wade, David Toft, Paul Keene, Madison Johns, Alan Jankowski and Stephen King. Maybe I don’t “know” that last one, but I once nearly met him at a book signing years ago, so he probably barely remembers me. I’m sure he’s read my work though. Amazing list, right? And I’m sure I am leaving someone out. Here’s something else about my list.

meeteauthorI’ve paid for every book on the list. Okay, there are two exceptions to this. Vincent Zandri sent me a copy of one of his, and I traded Paul Keene a signed copy of Redemption for his book Among the Jimson Weeds. Other than that, I buy the author’s work. There is a reason for this. First, it helps support the author. We all love free books, but we authors also like to eat. I give away some of my books, but most I sell. Therefore I don’t ask other authors for free books, and when I buy them as I can.

Also, then if I don’t like the book, I don’t feel obligated to leave a review or even give feedback to the author. Now, to be fair, I vet books pretty well before I buy them. I read excerpts and select reviews, ignoring the ones that offer too high of praise or too much criticism. I try to review, even briefly, as often as I can.

What does “know” mean on social media? These are not folks who spammed me with links until I gave in and bought their books. No. I’ve interacted with them. Kristen Lamb and I both like to cook and fire weaponry. Another friend (I highly recommend her romances to those who read that genre) Debbie Robbins and I talk scotch and travel. The rest of us all talk books, what it means to be an author, and about our families, our jobs, and our lives. Paul lives nearby, and he and I are pioneering a local writer’s group.

BookshelfThese writers have offered me nothing for their mention here, and they haven’t all read and reviewed my work. This is not a quid pro quo post. You do for me, I do for you, or vice versa. I read what I like. I have been offered free books, even sent free books by other authors (unsolicited) that I have not read or read and/or not reviewed. If you send me something without asking, this will likely be the result. I read these authors because I like them, and as an extension I find I like their work.

Here is the bottom line: be real and be connected on social media. Those you connect with will buy your work, read it, sometimes review it, or sometimes not. Not everyone will buy, but then that shouldn’t be your goal. Social media is about being social. So go ahead. Look at your To Be Read list, and see what you can learn. Chances are you “know” a lot of people on it.

Published inAdvice for AuthorsFor Readers