Month: April 2017

Business 101 for Writers: Production Part 4: Re-writing

Business for writers is a complicated topic, and so far we have covered several things, mostly related to writing, with brief notes on writer’s block (not allowed) and self-editing (does not work), but there is a step we must cover before we move on to the next step, which is editing. There are a couple of things every author needs to know about editing:  first, there are several types and each editor calls them by different names. What it really comes down to is a process that has four main steps, although there can be other smaller steps under...

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GUEST POST: How to Market Yourself as a Writer and Build an Audience

Succeeding as an author on the internet is predicated on the ability to adequately market yourself and your work. You may write the best eBook on the market, yet lacking the ability to craft an equally compelling “pitch” will seriously hamper the likelihood of anyone reading or purchasing said eBook. All works must be compelling in both presentation (headline, cover, etc) and content (article, video, etc). The quality of your presentation will determine whether someone picks up your book or clicks on your link. Terrible content with great presentation will attract curiosity but will not create or retain fans. Great content with terrible presentation (see: marketing) will struggle in obscurity but could still build a small loyal following. In order to connect your work with potential readers and consumers, focus on three primary goals: Make a great impression Promote engagement Demonstrate long-term value If you are an online publisher who writes articles or columns, your first impression to readers comes via an attractive headline. Great headlines attract views. Compelling content engages readers. Together, these components demonstrate value and results in social shares. Attract an Audience You only have a split second to make an impression. According to Copyblogger, “On average, 8 out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only 2 out of 10 will read the rest.” If you’re writing online, that great impression can be crafting a...

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Choosing a Domain Name for Your Blog

When it comes to creating a blog or a website, your domain name is extremely important. While there are a host of other factors involved, your website name is the first way people will find you. Moment of truth? Most internet traffic comes from either search engines or social media, and your domain name affects both of those things. So as an author, or as a brand, you have a couple of choices when it comes to choosing a website name. Who You Are For some businesses or even authors, this is simple. For instance, troylambertwrites.com uses both my...

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Why a Freelance Content Strategist Would Have Saved Pepsi

Brands are increasingly abandoning ad agencies or acquiring them and forming in-house marketing and content creation departments in the name of efficiency and speed. Pepsi is no exception. At last year’s Cannes Lions Festival, president Brad Jakeman energetically talked up its decision to form a new in-house content creation arm, Creators League Studio. “Instead of five pieces of content a year, a brand like Pepsi needs about 5,000 pieces of content a year. Instead of taking six months to develop an ad, we have six hours or six days. And instead of it costing $2 million, it needs to...

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GUEST POST: 5 Ways Zoho Projects Helped Me Grow My Wedding Business

All small businesses, including being an author or freelance writer, have many things in common. One is that you must learn to organize your projects. People use different kinds of software to do so. Fred Findley owns his own wedding business, and today shares how Zoho Projects has helped him grow. While growing your business never ceases to present new challenges, I am sure most business owners can remember the early days. One hundred hour work weeks that begin before sunrise and end well past midnight. A few hours of sleep then start all over again. In the beginning, everything is new and processes are constantly changing and developing. Eventually, these processes start becoming standard procedures, but everything is in the brain of the owner who is operating off memory. Even the best of us would forget the most minor of steps from time to time, or know that deep down each project you did wasn’t always being done 100% like the previous project. Eventually, all small businesses have to organize their procedures; projects for clients, processing contracts, social media tasks, or other day-to-day operations. Until that happens, that small business owner suffers from inconsistencies, mistakes (small and large), and the inability to have assistance or employees help because all the processes are in the memory of the owner. My Introduction to Lean Concepts and Operational Excellence While I was getting my wedding business started ( www.FineLineWeddings.com ), I was...

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